What to Post in Facebook Groups

Have you started using Facebook Groups? Facebook, in the last few years, has raised their priority of groups.

Groups allow for a smaller, more private, and more focused connection of people. Even though more people have come to understand the value of Facebook Groups, they still are the best-kept secret of engaging people online.

Nona Jones, from Facebook, works specifically with churches and non-profits. She has consistently encouraged organizations to see the value of Facebook groups.

Below, I want to provide two podcast interviews that share more from Nona Jones with Carey Nieuwhof:

As you consider Facebook groups, Jones envisions groups as the living room. This platform allows for conversation, connection, and sharing. It’s not about broadcasting.

Currently, I manage eight Facebook Groups. I’m continually surprised by how new people find these groups. They connect people in conversation.

So whether you’re new to Facebook Groups or utilized them before, I want to share a few post ideas to build interaction:

Elimination Posts

If you had to choose to get rid of one, would you choose — tacos, wings, pizza, or ribs? Brady Shearer from Pro-Church Tools has enhanced this question ( click here for more). Elimination questions act as easy-to-respond icebreakers. As you think about engaging a group, you want to provide opportunities for people to respond quickly and clearly.

Facebook Polls

Recently, we asked in groups who would want to meet in-person in a socially distant manner. Polls allow you to get feedback in real-time. You can use polls for fun too. Again, polls provide a quick and clear way to interact.

Photos of People

If I’m honest, this type of post is where I could grow in managing groups. Groups create personal connections. The more that you can highlight people and share about others, the more people will feel as though they’re in a living room and not a broadcast room.

Newsletters and Bulletins

Yes, groups are more about engagement than broadcasting. Don’t miss the opportunity to share important updates and information. Each week, we share our Monday morning email with Sunday resources, including the message, group guide, and other content. You provide a service of prompting groups with relevant content.

Spiritual Formation Posts — Prayer prompts, Bible Verses, and Engaging Questions

I’m speaking specifically to churches and pastors. You have the opportunity to redeem the social media spaces. We can start a discussion on what impacted people in the sermon. People can share their most encouraging Bible verses. Consider the encouragement of getting tagged in a post that someone was praying for you. These posts can bring people together.

What have you learned from engaging a Facebook Group? Share your thoughts in the comment section below.

Photo by Morning Brew on Unsplash

Originally published at https://peterenglert.com on July 10, 2020.

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Adult Ministries Director @Browncroft . Host on @WGWPodcast. Married to @RobynEnglert | Subscribe to my blog ➡️ http://eepurl.com

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Peter Englert

Peter Englert

Adult Ministries Director @Browncroft . Host on @WGWPodcast. Married to @RobynEnglert | Subscribe to my blog ➡️ http://eepurl.com

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